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investment

oregon sunstone as an investment

oregon sunstone as an investment

Gemstone Rating Score

GEMSTONE

Color (2)

SEE NOTE 3

Rarity (1)

Hardness

Refractive Index Rating

Current Market Value (4)

AVERAGE RATING SCORE

SEE NOTE 3

SEE NOTE 3

Oregon Sunstone (3)

SEE NOTE 3

10

9

7

1.5

9

7.3

Diamond

8

4

10

10

3

7.0

Sapphire (3)

SEE NOTE 3

9

7

9

3.5

5

6.7

Garnet (3)

SEE NOTE 3

7

8

7.5

4

5

6.3

Danburite

8

4

7.5

2

10

6.3

Spinel

8

7

8

3

5

6.2

Topaz

7

6

8

2

8

6.2

Tourmaline (3)

SEE NOTE 3

6

10

7

2.5

4

5.9

Color Change Diaspore

10

3

7

3.5

6

5.9

Tanzanite

10

4

6

3

6

5.8

Aquamarine

8

3

8

1.5

7

5.5

Peridot

6

3

6.5

3

8

5.3

Emerald

9

3

8

1.5

4

5.1

Amethyst

5

2

7

1.5

8

4.7

Typically, the rarity of natural, untreated gems varies by color. For example, red diamond is substantially rarer than yellow diamond, imperial Topaz is much rarer than colorless Topaz, and Siberian Demantoid (type of Garnet) is much rarer than deep red Almandine (also a type of Garnet). Color and rarity scores (1 to 10) indicate the average value of particular gem across each category.

  1. The rarity score is based on the number of individual sources (mines) producing the gemstone and the estimated annual production volume of the gemstone.
  2. The color score is based on the color range in which the particular gemstone occurs. For example Sapphire is found in shades of green, pink, red, purple, and yellow in addition to many shades of blue. Emerald is found only in a few shades of green.
  3. This particular gemstone group consists of many different subtypes and color varieties. Each subtype has a different rarity score. Some are very rare (e.g., Demantoid or cuprian Oregon Sunstone) while others are much more common (e.g., deep red Pyrope (Garnet group) or Schorl (black Tourmaline)). The rarity score was calculated by averaging the scores of each variety in the group.
  4. Market value factor is lower for overpriced gems reaching their market value potential (for example Tourmaline, Tanzanite or Spinel), and higher for currently underpriced gems (Oregon Sunstone, Danburite or Arizona Peridot).